The Latest

shopethica:

Changing fashion! Join the movement www.manoszapotecas.com
Jun 9, 2014 / 15 notes

shopethica:

Changing fashion! Join the movement www.manoszapotecas.com

If you want to shop more fairly and sustainably, you’ll likely have to forego a lot of seasonal trends because they just don’t make sense in the long run and ethical retailers don’t carry them anyway. Now I’m beginning to embrace a bit more simplicity in the way I dress, which makes it easier to find clothing and accessories through more ethical channels.
Jun 9, 2014 / 7 notes
Our paloma bag is perfect for festival season …
May 16, 2014 / 2 notes

Our paloma bag is perfect for festival season …

We put together this perfect spring look with some of our favorite ethical brands. 
The Mia Skirt by Amour Vert features a flattering chevron pattern and A-line skirt in comfy cotton. Amour Vert believes that women shouldn’t have to sacrifice style for sustainability. They always employ a zero-waste design philosophy and use only organic and sustainable fabrics along with low  impact dyes.  This skirt was made in California.
This perfectly distressed jean jacket by Nudie jeans is just-the-right cover up if the day chills off and the organic cotton denim balances the softness of the rest of the outfit. Nudie strives to produce denim in an environmentally, but also socially responsible way. This includes every step of the production, to the finished product being handed to customers over the counter at the retailer.
Julie Bee’s ballet flat is crafted with eco-friendly Italian leather with recycled backs. I love the simplicity and the statement of the cream against the black heel. Ethically handcrafted in Atlanta.
The Wintermute Gold Glasses by Westward Leaning are verging on futuristic yet perfectly on trend with mirrored gold lenses and  sophisticated black frames and 100% UVA/UVB protection. The frames are all hand-made in Japan, and Westward Leaning then integrates all the unique material in their San Francisco office.
The Compass Stack Rings and the Tasman Necklace by Nettie Kent are handmade in Brooklyn by Nettie herself. The beautiful lapis stone in the necklace was bought from an old Colorado, then crushed and set in the bronze. The blue of the stone creates a bit of eye-popping color, while the compass rings perfectly mimic the necklaces shape. Kent’s organic forms, unique designs and her ethical approach to jewelry making emphasizes sustainable design and sourcing recycled materials.
The Isablel Gray and Cream Diamond Purse by Manos Zapotecas is the perfectly bag to finish the ensemble. All MZ bags are handwoven in Oaxaca, expertly finished with leather trimming and handles and are certified fair trade to ensure the weavers receive a fair wage, and support throughout the process.
May 16, 2014

We put together this perfect spring look with some of our favorite ethical brands. 

The Mia Skirt by Amour Vert features a flattering chevron pattern and A-line skirt in comfy cotton. Amour Vert believes that women shouldn’t have to sacrifice style for sustainability. They always employ a zero-waste design philosophy and use only organic and sustainable fabrics along with low  impact dyes.  This skirt was made in California.

This perfectly distressed jean jacket by Nudie jeans is just-the-right cover up if the day chills off and the organic cotton denim balances the softness of the rest of the outfit. Nudie strives to produce denim in an environmentally, but also socially responsible way. This includes every step of the production, to the finished product being handed to customers over the counter at the retailer.

Julie Bee’s ballet flat is crafted with eco-friendly Italian leather with recycled backs. I love the simplicity and the statement of the cream against the black heel. Ethically handcrafted in Atlanta.

The Wintermute Gold Glasses by Westward Leaning are verging on futuristic yet perfectly on trend with mirrored gold lenses and  sophisticated black frames and 100% UVA/UVB protection. The frames are all hand-made in Japan, and Westward Leaning then integrates all the unique material in their San Francisco office.

The Compass Stack Rings and the Tasman Necklace by Nettie Kent are handmade in Brooklyn by Nettie herself. The beautiful lapis stone in the necklace was bought from an old Colorado, then crushed and set in the bronze. The blue of the stone creates a bit of eye-popping color, while the compass rings perfectly mimic the necklaces shape. Kent’s organic forms, unique designs and her ethical approach to jewelry making emphasizes sustainable design and sourcing recycled materials.

The Isablel Gray and Cream Diamond Purse by Manos Zapotecas is the perfectly bag to finish the ensemble. All MZ bags are handwoven in Oaxaca, expertly finished with leather trimming and handles and are certified fair trade to ensure the weavers receive a fair wage, and support throughout the process.

Small wonder where our weavers get the inspiration for the colors in their work … 
May 16, 2014

Small wonder where our weavers get the inspiration for the colors in their work … 

wherever you are …
Apr 15, 2014 / 341,481 notes

wherever you are …

(via pushovers)

Amazing image by Diego Huerta of a costena woman from Puerto Angel. 
Apr 13, 2014 / 179 notes

Amazing image by Diego Huerta of a costena woman from Puerto Angel. 

More ikat inspiration: Coat by Mohawk General Store
Apr 11, 2014 / 5 notes

More ikat inspiration: Coat by Mohawk General Store

Inspired by ikat 
Apr 11, 2014 / 1 note

Inspired by ikat 

Apr 11, 2014 / 1,916 notes

yagazieemezi:

FASHION FEATURE:

New Zealand designer Karen Walker works with lensman Derek Henderson to shoot her Spring 2013 collection. Walker didn’t just employ the talents of artisans in Kenya, she had them model the looks, too. Partnering with the United Nations–endorsed Ethical Fashion Initiative, whose motto “Not Charity, Just Work” seeks to promote sustainable development over aid, Walker tasked the African nation’s finest micro-producers, designers, and craftspeople to produce the screen-printed pouches that will accompany every Karen Walker eyewear purchase from the collection.

I actually like this initiative because it highlights the machinists, cutters, tailors, production managers, and metal workers involved in the collection, as well as the Maasai crafters behind some of the more intricate beadwork seen on the pouch case.